Playing a virginal with finger crossings Bach autograph with Baroque fingerings Playing a two-manual harpsichord with old fingerings Playing a Baroque organ with early fingerings

BAROQUE KEYBOARD MASTERPIECES

FINGERED WITH BAROQUE TECHNIQUE

by Claudio Di Veroli

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The author

Born in Buenos Aires (Argentina) into an Italian family, Claudio Di Veroli studied under Ernesto Epstein (piano and interpretation), Erwin Leuchter (harmony and continuo), Ljerko Spiller (chamber music) and other internationally renowned musicians. As a performer Di Veroli won several Argentine musical competitions and played extensively in public recitals. With a degree in Mathematics, he moved to England where he pursued research in Statistics at Imperial College London, studying under the supervision of Prof. Sir David R. Cox. He simultaneously continued his musical training, studying the harpsichord under Colin Tilney in London and Hubert Bédard in Paris.

              
                  Playing the harpsichord by Shudi & Broadwood 1770 in the Fenton House, London 1970

For some years he was granted access and practised extensively on the antique keyboards in the Fenton House London and the Paris Conservatoire’s Musée Instrumental (now Musée de la Musique).

              
                          Playing the Ruckers-Taskin 1646-1780 in the Conservatoire, Paris 1975

Having obtained his PhD in London, Di Veroli went back to Buenos Aires to work as a consultant in information systems, while always devoting considerable time and effort to music. He introduced in Argentina the harpsichords based on early models, building a French double Hubbard kit later described on a leading newspaper as the best harpsichord in South America. A founder member of the Telemann Chamber Group, Di Veroli pioneered the performance of Baroque music based on ancient instruments and practices, including early tuning systems and the use of Baroque fingerings throughout his public performances since the early 1980s. Considered a leading specialist in Baroque interpretation in South America, he has been Professor of Harpsichord and examiner of the Organ course at theConservatorio Nacional Superior in Buenos Aires. In the Bach-year 1985 he premiered the performance of J.S. Bach’s harpsichord concertos using his own reconstruction of Bach’s fingering technique.

                        Recital “History of French Harpsichordists”, Museo de Arte Español Enrique Larreta, Buenos Aires 1988

Di Veroli has carried out extensive research in the interpretation of French Baroque music, historical keyboard fingerings and unequal temperaments, often applying advanced scientific and computer tools. His writings have been endorsed in writing by leading musicians and musicologists such as Gustav Leonhardt, Igor Kipnis, John Barnes, Patrizio Barbieri and Fred Sturm. They include four treatises that have received favourable reviews:

As a soloist—mostly on the harpsichord but also on the organ—he has performed extensively in concert halls, chamber music venues, churches and television, both solo and with ensembles, with very favourable reviews in leading newspapers. His last public performance before leaving Argentina was the final recital of the 2000 season at the Baroque “Colonial” Organ in Buenos Aires Cathedral

              
                               Recital on the Colonial Organ in the Cathedral, Buenos Aires 2000

With his wife Betty he relocated to Ireland in 2001. His most recent recitals have been on his two-manual Hubbard-Di Veroli harpsichord based on Taskin.

              
          Recital on the Hubbard-Di Veroli harpsichord in the Mermaid Arts Centre, Bray (rep. Ireland) 2003

Recent teaching practices of Di Veroli include masterclasses in Argentina, Uruguay, Italy and Ireland.

              
     Recital on a two-manual French-model harpsichord by Pérez Robledo after a Masterclass, Buenos Aires 2009

In his organ recitals Di Veroli plays Baroque music, mostly by F. Couperin, Handel and J.S. Bach.

              
                  Recital on the tracker organ by Kenneth Jones in the Holy Redeemer Church, Bray 2010

More recently he has been working in editions of harpsichord music with Baroque Fingerings and a Performance Guide:

Since 2015 his musical activity is based in Lucca, Italy.

              
                      Recital on a two-manual French-model harpsichord by François Ciocca, after the
                               Masterclass in the Conservatorio “Luisa D'Annunzio”, Pescara (Italy) 2017